• Grand Rounds contact:
    grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


    Continuing Education contact:
    ce.service@dshs.state.tx.us

     

Presentations

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Spring 2017 Semester

The Spring 2017 semester of Grand Rounds begins on April 5 and ends on May 10, 2017. All presentations are free and are held on Wednesdays from 11:00 am to 12:30 pm, Central Time, in Austin (K-100 Lecture Hall,located in the lobby of the Bernstein building at 1100 W. 49th Street, see map) or via webinar.

If you have a disability and need accommodations for this event, please contact us one week before the event so we may arrange for accommodations.


Upcoming Presentations

Questions? E-mail grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us

   

archer, natalie

Natalie Archer, PhD  
Office of Program Decision Support, Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS

kormondy, michelle

Michelle Kormondy, BS  
Office of Program Decision Support, Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS

guthrie, tanya

Tanya Guthrie, PhD
Office of Program Decision Support, Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS

saxton, debra

Debra Saxton, MS
Office of Program Decision Support, Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS

GR-04-05-2017 presentation image2

Maternal and Child Health Surveillance in Texas: Recent Trends

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Presenters
Natalie Archer, PhD
Office of Program Decision Support, Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS
Michelle Kormondy, BS
Office of Program Decision Support, Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS
Tanya Guthrie, PhD
Office of Program Decision Support, Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS
Debra Saxton, MS
Office of Program Decision Support, Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS

Description:
The Office of Program Decision Support (OPDS) in the Family and Community Health Services Division, DSHS will provide an overview of current statistics and trends for maternal and child health in Texas. An overview of results included in the 2016 Healthy Texas Babies Data Book and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) Data Book will be presented, as will specific PRAMS topical area analyses. The 2016 Healthy Texas Babies Data Book provides an overview of infant health in Texas, as well as maternal health before and during pregnancy, which directly impacts infant health. PRAMS is a population-based surveillance system designed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that asks survey questions (via mail or telephone) of recent mothers on health topics. OPDS uses data from a wide range of sources to assess the current status of maternal and child health in Texas, as well as needs and disparities within the maternal and child health population.

Learning Objectives:  

  • Summarize recent data on maternal and infant health before during and after pregnancy to provide a cohesive view of Texas.
  • Describe yearly trends in maternal and child health data and the importance on ongoing surveillance.
  • Discuss how data are utilized to support programs such as the Title V Maternal and Child Health Block Grant.

1.5 Continuing Education/Contact Hours Available for the Following:

  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits
  • Continuing Nursing Education
  • Social Workers
  • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists
  • Registered Sanitarians

A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

Suggested Resources:

  1. Texas Dept. of State Health Services. 2016 Healthy Texas Babies Data Book. http://www.dshs.texas.gov/healthytexasbabies/data.aspx
  2. National PRAMS info:  https://www.cdc.gov/prams/
  3. Texas Dept. of State Health Services. Texas PRAMS. http://www.dshs.texas.gov/mch/PRAMS.aspx
  4. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Committee Opionion No. 569: Oral health care during pregnancy and through the lifespan. Obstet Gynecol. 2013; 122:417-22.  
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). PRAMS. https://www.cdc.gov/prams/.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Preconception health indicators among women--Texas, 2002-2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2012; 61(29):550-5.
  7. K.K. Davison, J.N. Charles, N. Khandpur, and T.J. Nelson. Fathers’ perceived reasons for their underrepresentation in child health research and strategies to increase their involvement. Matern Child Health J. 2017; 21:267-274.  
  8. L.A. Detman, B.H. Cottrell, and M.F. Denis‐Luque. Exploring dental care misconceptions and barriers in pregnancy. Birth. 2010; 37(4):318-324.  
  9. F. Hauck, J. Thompson, K. Tanabe, R. Moon and M. Vennemann. Breastfeeding and the reduced risk of sudden infant death syndrome: A meta-analysis. Pediatrics. 2011; 128(1):103-110.
  10. S. McDonald, Z. Han, S. Mulla, J. Beyene and Knowledge Synthesis Group. Overweight and obesity in mothers and risk of preterm birth and low birth weight infants: systematic review and meta-analyses. BMJ. 2010; 241:c3428.  
  11. M. Peck, W. Sappenfield and J. Skala. Perinatal periods of risk: a community approach for using data to improve women and infants' health. Matern Child Health J. 2010; 14(6):864-874.

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      hagermeier, nicholas

      Nicholas Hagemeier, PharmD, PhD
      Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, East Tennessee State University Gatton College of Pharmacy

      barnes, j nile

      J. Nile Barnes, PharmD, BCPS
      Clinical Assistant Professor of Health  Outcomes and Pharmacy Practice at the University of Texas – Austin, 
      College of Pharmacy

      strey, kasey

      Kasey Strey, ACPS
      SPF-Rx Project Director and Substance Abuse Prevention Program Specialist, Texas Health and Human Services Commission

      GR-04-12-2017 presentation image2

      The Prescription Opioid Abuse Epidemic: How It Happened and Solutions

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      Presenters:
      Nicholas Hagemeier, PharmD, PhD
      Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, East Tennessee State University Gatton College of Pharmacy
      J. Nile Barnes, PharmD, BCPS
      Clinical Assistant Professor of Health  Outcomes and Pharmacy Practice at the University of Texas – Austin, College of Pharmacy
      Kasey Strey, ACPS
      SPF-Rx Project Director and Substance Abuse Prevention Program Specialist, Texas Health and Human Services Commission

      Description:   
      Rates of prescription drug misuse in Texas are alarmingly high. One in five Texas high school students have taken prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription. In 2015, Texas had the second highest total healthcare costs from opioid abuse in the nation ($1.96 billion), and Texas is home to four of the top 25 cities in the U.S. for opioid abuse. Meanwhile, only one in three prescribers is using the statewide Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP), leading to a massive loss of data. There is substantial need for increased infrastructure and prevention measures in Texas, especially related to the emergence of prescription drug misuse.

      This panel will describe the current landscape of prescription drug misuse and its consequences, discuss strategies to turn down misuse, and explain the proactive approach Texas is taking to enhance misuse prevention and data infrastructure across the state.

      Learning Objectives:

      • Describe the current landscape of prescription drug misuse and its consequences.
      • Summarize multiple strategies employed by states to prevent prescription drug misuse and the consequences thereof. 
      • Discuss Texas-specific approaches and initiatives to prevent opioid misuse.

      1.5 Continuing Education/Contact Hours Available for the Following:

      • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits
      • Continuing Nursing Education 
      • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists 
      • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors
      • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists 
      • Licensed Professional Counselors 
      • Licensed Psychologists 
      • Registered Sanitarians
      • Social Workers 

      A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

      Suggested Resources: 
      To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail  library@dshs.state.tx.us.

      1. Chandwani HS, Strassels SA, Rascati KL, Lawson KA, Wilson JP. Estimates of charges associated with emergency department and hospital inpatient care for opioid abuse-related events. J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother. 2013 Aug;27(3):206-13. 
      2. Forrester MB. Temporal and geographic patterns in opioid abuse in Texas. J Addict Dis. 2012;31(2):93-9.
      3. Lyapustina T, Rutkow L, Chang HY, et al. Effect of a "pill mill" law on opioid prescribing and utilization: The case of Texas. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2016 Feb 1;159:190-7. 
      4. Manchikanti L, Kaye AM, Knezevic NN, et al. Responsible, safe, and effective prescription of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain: American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) guidelines. Pain Physician. 2017 Feb;20(2S):S3-S92.
      5. Maxwell JC. The prescription drug epidemic in the United States: a perfect storm. Drug Alcohol Rev. 2011 May;30(3):264-70.
      6. Potter JS, Dreifuss JA, Marino EN, et al. The multi-site prescription opioid addiction treatment study: 18-month outcomes. J Subst Abuse Treat. 2015 Jan;48(1):62-9.
      7. Schepis TS, McCabe SE. Trends in older adult nonmedical prescription drug use prevalence: Results from the 2002-2003 and 2012-2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Addict Behav. 2016 Sep;60:219-22.
      8. Vaughn MG, Nelson EJ, Salas-Wright CP, Qian Z, Schootman M. Racial and ethnic trends and correlates of non-medical use of prescription opioids among adolescents in the United States 2004-2013. J Psychiatr Res. 2016 Feb;73:17-24.

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          isaac, reena

          Reena Isaac, MD
          Texas Children’s Hospital - Houston; 
          Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine;
          Medical Director of the Harris County Children’s Assessment Center

          melton, kirsta leeburg

          Kirsta Leeburg Melton, JD
          Deputy Criminal Chief, Human Trafficking and Transnational/Organized Crime Section,
          Office of the Texas Attorney General



          GR-04-19-2017 presentation image2

          Human Trafficking and the Healthcare Community 101

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          Presenters: 
          Reena Isaac, MD
          Texas Children’s Hospital - Houston; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine; Medical Director of the Harris County Children’s Assessment Center
          Kirsta Leeburg Melton, JD
          Deputy Criminal Chief, Human Trafficking and Transnational/Organized Crime Section, Office of the Texas Attorney General

          Description: 
          This Grand Rounds presentation is intended for professionals in the healthcare community, providing an introductory overview of human trafficking, with additional information on indicators and reporting. Human trafficking is akin to modern day slavery - a relationship in which one person is controlled by another through violence, the threat of violence, or psychological coercion; where the individual has lost free will and free movement, and is exploited economically.

          The major types of trafficking under Texas law include: (1) trafficking of adults for forced labor, particularly in the areas of agriculture, food service, factory work, and sales; (2) trafficking of adults for sex, particularly in strip clubs, brothels, massage parlors, and street or internet prostitution; (3) trafficking of children under the age of 18 for forced labor; and (4) trafficking of children under the age of 18 for sex.

          Learning Objectives:  

          • Define and describe the problem of human trafficking in Texas
          • Discuss the major types of trafficking under Texas laws and potential solutions.

          1.5 Continuing Education/Contact Hours Available for the Following:

          • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
          • Continuing Nursing Education
          • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists
          • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists
          • Licensed Professional Counselors
          • Licensed Psychologists
          • Registered Sanitarians
          • Social Workers

          A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

          Suggested Resources:
          To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail  library@dshs.state.tx.us.

          1. Baldwin SB, Fehrenbacher AE, Eisenman DP. Psychological coercion in human trafficking: an application of Biderman's framework. Qual Health Res. 2015 Sep;25(9):1171-81. 
          2. Greenbaum VJ. Commercial sexual exploitation and sex trafficking of children in the United States. Curr Probl Pediatr Adolesc Health Care. 2014 Oct;44(9):245-69. 
          3. Hemmings S, Jakobowitz S, Abas M, et al. Responding to the health needs of survivors of human trafficking: a systematic review. BMC Health Serv Res. 2016 Jul 29;16:320. 
          4. McNiel M, Held T, Busch-Armendariz N. Creating an interdisciplinary medical home for survivors of human trafficking. Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Sep;124(3):611-5.
          5. Richards TA. Health implications of human trafficking. Nurs Womens Health. 2014 Apr-May;18(2):155-62. 
          6. Shandro J, Chisolm-Straker M, Duber HC, et al. Human trafficking: a guide to identification and approach for the emergency physician. Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Oct;68(4):501-508.e1.
          7. Todres J. Physician encounters with human trafficking: legal consequences and ethical considerations. AMA J Ethics. 2017 Jan 1;19(1):16-22.

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            gunderson, craig

            Craig Gunderson, PhD
            Professor, Department of Agricultural
            and Consumer Economics,
            University of Illinois

            hoelscher, deanna

            Deanna M. Hoelscher, PhD, RD, LD
            Director, Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living and
            Associate Regional Dean for Research at The University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus

            rutledge, ronda

            Ronda Rutledge, MA
            Executive Director, Sustainable Food Center, Austin



            GR-04-26-2017 presentation image2

            Food Access and Insecurity

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            Presenters:
            Craig Gunderson, PhD
            Professor, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois
            Deanna M. Hoelscher, PhD, RD, LD
            Director, Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living and Associate Regional Dean for Research at The University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus
            Ronda Rutledge, MA
            Executive Director, Sustainable Food Center, Austin

            Description: 
            Although the United States, including Texas, has an ample food supply, food insecurity and access are major public health problems. Food insecurity, is a household-level economic and social condition of limited or uncertain access to adequate food. The USDA reports that nearly 15% of American households are food insecure. In addition to food insecurity, food access is also a problem. SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Awareness Program is the largest program in the domestic hunger safety net working with State agencies, nutrition educators, and neighborhood and faith-based organizations to ensure that those eligible for nutrition assistance can make informed decisions about applying for the program and can access benefits. Please join this esteemed panel for an insightful discussion of the causes, impact, and creative solutions to our food access and insecurity problems.

            Learning Objectives:

            • Define the issue of food access and insecurity, including definitions, description of the problem, causes, scope, trends, and impact
            • Discuss potential solutions, including the findings of Texas research
            • Analyze a Sustainable Food Center - Austin case study - and describe the role of sustainable agriculture in reducing food access and insecurity.

            1.5 Continuing Education/Contact Hours Available for the Following:

            • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits
            • Continuing Nursing Education
            • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists Registered Sanitarians
            • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists
            • Licensed Professional Counselors
            • Registered Dietitians
            • Social Workers

            A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

            Suggested Resources:
            To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail  library@dshs.state.tx.us.

            1. Hilmers A, Chen TA, Cullen KW. Household food insecurity and dietary intake among Mexican-American women participating in federal food assistance programs. Am J Health Promot. 2014 Jul-Aug;28(6):e146-54. 
            2. Mangini LD, Hayward MD, Dong YQ, Forman MR. Household food insecurity is associated with childhood asthma. J Nutr. 2015 Dec;145(12):2756-64. 
            3. Reitzel LR, Okamoto H, Hernandez DC, et al. The built food environment and dietary intake among African-American adults. Am J Health Behav. 2016 Jan;40(1):3-11. 
            4. Salinas JJ, Abdelbary B, Klaas K, Tapia B, Sexton K. Socioeconomic context and the food landscape in Texas: results from hotspot analysis and border/non-border comparison of unhealthy food environments. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 May 26;11(6):5640-50.
            5. Sharkey JR, Dean WR, Nalty CC. Child hunger and the protective effects of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and alternative food sources among Mexican-origin families in Texas border colonias. BMC Pediatr. 2013 Sep 13;13:143. 
            6. Sharkey JR, Nalty C, Johnson CM, Dean WR. Children's very low food security is associated with increased dietary intakes in energy, fat, and added sugar among Mexican-origin children (6-11 y) in Texas border colonias. BMC Pediatr. 2012 Feb 20;12-16.
            7. Sharkey JR, Johnson CM, Dean WR. Relationship of household food insecurity to health-related quality of life in a large sample of rural and urban women. Women Health. 2011 Jul 22;51(5):442-60. 
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            defronzo, ralph

            Ralph A. DeFronzo, MD
            Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Diabetes Division at the University of Texas Health Science Center; Deputy Director of the Texas Diabetes Institute, San Antonio

            GR-05-03-2017 presentation image2

            Type 2 Diabetes Research

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            Presenter:  
            Ralph A. DeFronzo, MD
            Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Diabetes Division at the University of Texas Health Science Center; Deputy Director of the Texas Diabetes Institute, San Antonio

            Description:

            Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an expanding global health problem, closely linked to the epidemic of obesity. Environmental factors, such as obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity as well as genetic factors all contribute to the impact of the disease. T2DM complications may be disabling or even life-threatening including: cardiovascular disease; nerve damage (neuropathy); kidney damage (nephropathy); and eye damage (retinopathy).

              Please join internationally recognized T2DM researcher, Ralph A, Defronzo, Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Diabetes Division at the University of Texas Health Science Center; Deputy Director of the Texas Diabetes Institute for a discussion of the complexity T2DM including the incidence, symptoms, risk factors, causes, and a special focus on current research into the causes and treatment.

            Learning Objectives:  

            • Describe the epidemiology of T2DM.
            • Discuss the pathophysiology of T2DM.
            • Examine the treatment of T2DM, with emphasis on combination therapy.
            • Assess recent cardiovascular outcomes trials in people with T2DM.

            1.5 Continuing Education/Contact Hours Available for the Following:

            • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits
            • Continuing Nursing Education
            • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists 
            • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists
            • Licensed Professional Counselors
            • Registered Dietitians
            • Registered Sanitarians
            • Social Workers

            A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

            Suggested Resources:
            To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail  library@dshs.state.tx.us.

            1. Abdul-Ghani MA, Norton L, DeFronzo RA. Renal sodium-glucose cotransporter inhibition in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2015 Dec 1;309(11):F889-900. 
            2. Ferrannini E, DeFronzo RA. Impact of glucose-lowering drugs on cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. Eur Heart J. 2015 Sep 7;36(34):2288-96. 
            3. Kulkarni H, Kos MZ, Neary J, et al. Novel epigenetic determinants of type 2 diabetes in Mexican-American families. Hum Mol Genet. 2015 Sep 15;24(18):5330-44. 
            4. McEwen MM, Lin PC, Pasvogel A. Analysis of behavior risk factor surveillance system data to assess the health of Hispanics with diabetes in US-Mexico border communities. Diabetes Educ. 2013 Nov-Dec;39(6):742-51. 
            5. Politi C, Ciccacci C, D'Amato C, et al. Recent advances in exploring the genetic susceptibility to diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2016 Oct;120:198-208. 
            6. Ponder SW. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents: 'the family disease of the 21st century'. Tex Med. 2009 Feb 1;105(2):33-7.
            7. Rascati KL, Richards KM, Lopez D, Cheng LI, Wilson JP. Progression to insulin for patients with diabetes mellitus using the Texas Medicaid database. Clin Ther. 2011 Dec;33(12):2016-20.
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              May 10: COMING SOON!

              Presenter:  

              Description:   

              Learning Objectives:

              Suggested Resources: COMING SOON!

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              Last updated March 22, 2017