• Grand Rounds contact:
    grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


    Continuing Education contact:
    ce.service@dshs.state.tx.us


    TRAIN Texas contact:
    txtrain@dshs.state.tx.us

Presentations

E-mail updates


GR slogan tall

Summer 2016 Semester

The Summer 2016 semester of Grand Rounds begins on July 13 and ends on July 20, 2016. All presentations are free and are held on Wednesdays from 11:00 am to 12:30 pm, Central Time, in Austin (K-100 Lecture Hall at 1100 W. 49th Street, see map) or via webinar.

If you have a disability and need accommodations for this event, please contact us one week before the event so we may arrange for accommodations.


Past Presentations

Please note: CE credits/contact hours are no longer available for these presentations.

Questions? E-mail grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


GR-7-13-2016 presenter Istvan

Alesha Istvan
Director of Prevention Programs, Texas Council on Family Violence

GR-7-13-2016 presenter DelGallo

Krista A. Del Gallo
Policy Manager, Texas Council on Family Violence

GR-7-13-2016 presentation image

Intimate Partner Violence - REGISTER HERE

Presenters: Alesha Istvan, Director of Prevention Programs, Texas Council on Family Violence and Krista A. Del Gallo, Policy Manager, Texas Council on Family Violence

Description: Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a serious, preventable public health problem that affects millions of Americans. The term "intimate partner violence" describes physical, sexual, or psychological harm caused by a current or former partner or spouse. IPV can vary in frequency and severity. It occurs on a continuum, ranging from one episode to chronic, severe battering. IPV can have lasting harmful effects on individuals, families, and communities. The goal for public health is to recognize and prevent IPV. Prevention efforts must be aimed at reducing the occurrence of intimate partner violence through the promotion of healthy, respectful, nonviolent relationships. Please join Krista A. Del Gallo, Policy Manager, Texas Council on Family Violence and Alesha Istvan, Director of Prevention Programs, Texas Council on Family Violence for an insightful examination of IPV.

Learning Objectives:  
Analyze the definitions and trends of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in Texas and the United States.
Describe the range of individual, family and community level intervention strategies. 
Discuss the effectiveness of community-level evidence-based prevention strategies.

1.5 continuing education credit/contact hours available for the following:

  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
  • Continuing Nursing Education
  • Social Workers
  • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists
  • Licensed Professional Counselors
  • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists
  • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors
  • Registered Sanitarians
  • Licensed Psychologists

A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

Presentation documents (.pdf):  slides   handouts

Suggested resources
: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Arroyo K, Lundahl B, Butters R, Vanderloo M, Wood DS. Short-term interventions for survivors of intimate partner violence: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Trauma Violence Abuse. 2015 Sep 2. pii: 1524838015602736. [Epub ahead of print]
  2. Dutton MA, James L, Langhorne A, Kelley M. Coordinated public health initiatives to address violence against women and adolescents. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2015 Jan;24(1):80-5.
  3. Freire KE, Zakocs R, Le B, Hill JA, Brown P, Wheaton J. Evaluation of DELTA PREP: a project aimed at integrating primary prevention of intimate partner violence within state domestic violence coalitions. Health Educ Behav. 2015 Aug;42(4):436-48.
  4. Gonzalez JM, Connell NM, Businelle MS, Jennings WG, Chartier KG. Characteristics of adults involved in alcohol-related intimate partner violence:  results from a nationally representative sample. BMC Public Health. 2014 May 17;14:466. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-466.
  5. Sumner SA, Mercy JA, Dahlberg LL, Hillis SD, Klevens J, Houry D. Violence in the United States: status, challenges, and opportunities. JAMA. 2015 Aug 4;314(5):478-88
  6. Weaver TL, Gilbert L, El-Bassel N, Resnick HS, Noursi S. Identifying and intervening with substance-using women exposed to intimate partner violence: phenomenology, comorbidities, and integrated approaches within primary care and other agency settings. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2015 Jan;24(1):51-6.
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      GR-7-20-2016 presenter robinson

      Lori Robinson, PhD Psychologist, Texas Juvenile Justice

      GR-7-20-2016 presenter williams

      Kimberly Williams
      Houston Department of Health and Human Services

      GR-7-20-2016 presentation image

      Youth Violence in Texas - REGISTER HERE

      Presenters: Lori Robinson, PhD, Psychologist, Texas Juvenile Justice and Kimberly Williams, Houston Department of Health and Human Services

      Description: This session of DSHS Grand Rounds will explore the societal burden of youth violence, and the evidence-based approaches and partnerships that are necessary to prevent youth violence and its consequences. Homicide, the third leading cause of death among young people 10 to 24, is responsible for more deaths in this group than the next six leading causes of death combined. Each day, there are 13 homicides in this age group and an additional 1,700 youth treated in U.S. emergency departments for assault-related injuries, resulting in an estimated $17.5 billion in total costs per year. Please join Lori Robinson, PhD, Texas Juvenile Justice and Kimberly Williams, Houston Department of Health & Human Services for a thought provoking discussion of youth violence.

      Learning Objectives: 
      Analyze the epidemiology of youth violence in Texas and the United States.
      Describe the range of individual, family and community level intervention strategies. 
      Discuss a case study of a Houston-based community prevention strategy.

      1.5 continuing education credit/contact hours available for the following: 

      • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
      • Continuing Nursing Education
      • Social Workers
      • Certified Health Education Specialists and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists
      • Licensed Professional Counselors
      • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists
      • Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors
      • Registered Sanitarians
      • Licensed Psychologists

      A certificate of attendance is available for those not seeking the credits/contact hours listed above.

      Presentation documents (.pdf): slides  handouts

      Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

      1. Cunningham RM, Carter PM, Ranney M, et al. Violent reinjury and mortality among youth seeking emergency department care for assault-related injury: a 2-year prospective cohort study. JAMA Pediatr. 2015 Jan;169(1):63-70.
      2. David-Ferdon C, Simon TR, Spivak H, et al. CDC grand rounds: preventing youth violence. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015 Feb 27;64(7):171-4.
      3. Duke NN, Borowsky IW. Youth violence prevention and safety: opportunities for health care providers. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2015 Oct;62(5):1137-58.
      4. Howell KH, Miller-Graff LE. Protective factors associated with resilient functioning in young adulthood after childhood exposure to violence. Child Abuse Negl. 2014 Dec;38(12):1985-94.
      5. Sood AB, Berkowitz SJ. Prevention of youth violence: a public health approach. Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 2016 Apr;25(2):243-56.
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            Last updated July 18, 2016