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    Texas Heart Disease and Stroke Program
    Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Section
    MC 1945
    PO Box 149347
    Austin, TX 78714-9347

    Phone: (512) 776-7111
    Fax:


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Texas Heart Disease and Stroke Program Grants and Projects

Program Grants 

State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors and Promote School Health 

This is a five-year CDC grant to implement a coordinated approach to reduce the burden of chronic condition. 

For more information, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/state-public-health-actions.htm.

Projects 

Home Blood Pressure Monitoring Project 
The Department of State Health Services (DSHS) Heart Disease and Stroke Program, together with partners, launched the Home Blood Pressure Monitoring Project in 2015. The TMF Quality Innovation Network Quality Improvement Organization (QIN-QIO), DSHS, and Northeast Texas Public Health District (NET Health) have partnered to increase blood pressure control in Northeast Texas through a joint project focused on home blood pressure monitoring. Home blood pressure monitoring, also known as self-measured blood pressure monitoring, is an evidence-based practice for improving blood pressure control. The project assists with efforts to increase blood pressure control rates in areas of Texas with high hypertension prevalence.

The Home Blood Pressure Monitoring Project was first piloted with four local health departments. These health departments adopted policies and procedure to support home blood pressure monitoring and worked with community partners to identify patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure. A certified Community Health Worker and/or staff provided patients with a home blood pressure monitor and taught patients how to use the monitor and track their blood pressure. Patients tracked their blood pressure daily and submitted weekly readings to the health department. Results from the pilot included an average decrease of 12 points diastolic and 7 points systolic among participants.


For more information, please send an email to cardio@dshs.state.tx.us.

Texas Pharmacy Association – Texas Hypertension Adherence Project

The Texas Pharmacy Association (TPA) implemented the North­east Texas Hypertension Adherence Program (NTHAP) to improve medication adherence and outcomes in high risk patients with hypertension by connecting patients to community pharmacists. Through this project, TPA developed a network of community pharmacists trained in hypertension and in improving medication adherence, connected patients with uncontrolled hypertension to community pharmacists for medication therapy management and counseling and lifestyle modification support upon hospital discharge or primary care referral. The project implemented in three communities in Northeast Texas referred 55 patients to community pharmacists. Out of the 55 patients referred to the program, 44 patients participated in the program, receiving counseling on the importance of taking medication as prescribed. Nine patients completed the program and achieved blood pressured control, defined as less than 140/90 mmHG.

To view the project poster, click here.
Please visit:
http://www.texaspharmacy.org/?page=TexasHTN_Project_2&hhSearchTerms=%22Medication+and+adherence%22

Dallas Fort Worth Hospital Council Education and Research Foundation (DFWHCERF) 

The DFWHCERF, through its North Regional Extension Center, worked with 11 physician practice groups to increase the use of health information technology and electronic health records for identifying, preventing and treating patients with high blood pressure, pre-diabetes, and diabetes. The practice groups completed quarterly surveys and developed intervention plans to evaluate progress in improving their electronic health record systems to better identify and treat patients with high blood pressure, pre-diabetes, and diabetes. DFWHCERF provided staff training and onsite technical assistance to implement interventions. At the end of the project, 90.1 percent of the practices are now able to report on hypertension (NQF18), up from 66 percent at the start of the project. Also, 96.4 percent of the practices are now able to report on diabetes (NQF59), up from 87.5 percent at the start of the project. Regarding prevention indicators, 54.0 percent of the practices are now able to report on pre-diabetes, up from 50 percent at the start of the project and 53.64 percent of the practices now record and track overweight and obese patients, up from 44.31 percent at the start of the project.

The DFWHCRF also conducted an environmental scan on the number and types of health systems in Texas, developed a best practice document for improving electronic health records, and provided outreach presentations on how to increase the use of health information technology and electronic health records for chronic disease management.

For more information, please visit: 

https://dfwhcfoundation.org/

Texas Area Health Education Center East through the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
Texas Area Health Education (AHEC) East, though the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, is improving its chronic disease management program by providing training to health professionals and providers. Training includes how to use clinical support tools and protocols to improve opportunities to diagnosis patients with hypertension and pre-diabetes, improve medication adherence among patients with diabetes and hypertension, and implement self-measured blood pressure monitoring. 


Texas AHEC East launched the pilot project for self-monitoring blood pressure in two community clinics: League City and Angleton. The clinical staff identified patients with uncontrolled blood pressure and without blood pressure monitoring devices. The patients are provided blood pressure monitoring devices and clinical staff taught them how to use the monitors and document the readings at home, as well as guided them to identify healthy lifestyle changes to improve lower blood pressure readings. The clinical staff follows these patients through (1) clinical encounters, (2) phone calls, and (3) MyChart emails to make sure that patients use the monitors at home accurately. Results are expected in the Fall 2018.


Texas AHEC East conducted three continuing education seminars on providers utilizing electronic health records, current trends in hypertension management, and using a team approach for improving medication adherence in patients diagnosed with hypertension and other co-morbid conditions.


**Conference presentations are now available for PDF download below:**

For more information, please visit: 

http://txaheceast.org/

Past Projects

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) to reduce disparities in hypertension identification and control among Texans through a state-wide learning collaborative
The Department of State Health Services (DSHS) Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Section (HPCDPS) has received a grant from the Association of State And Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) to reduce disparities in hypertension identification and control among Texans through a state-wide learning collaborative. 

The Texas Learning Collaborative: Creating Community-Clinical Linkages to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension Identification and Control implemented a multi-partner approach to support Texans with hypertension in achieving blood pressure control by increasing the reporting and monitoring of National Quality Forum Measure 18 (hypertension control), improving the identification of undiagnosed Texans with hypertension, and improving the diagnosis, treatment and follow up of Texans with hypertension. 

The Texas Learning Collaborative supported the following local health departments in North and Northeast Texas to achieve project goals. 

Jasper Newton County Public Health District 
Northeast Texas Public Health District 
Wichita Falls – Wichita County Public Health District 
For more information, please visit 
http://www.astho.org.

Last updated July 9, 2018