• DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

Epi Profile Section 2 - New HIV Diagnoses

 

 


 

Figure 2-1. HIV in Texas; People Living with HIV, New HIV Diagnoses,
and Deaths Due to HIV, 2006 - 2015

Figure 2-1. HIV in Texas; People living with HIV, new HIV diagnoses, and deaths due to HIV, 2005 - 2014. Data in Table 1.
Data on deaths is only available through 2013 due to a 2-year lag
in complete death reporting from the National Social Security Index

Data for Figure 2-1

 

  • In 2015, 4,486 cases of HIV were newly diagnosed in Texas, an increase of 1% from the previous year.The annual number of newly diagnosed HIV cases has remained constant through the last 10 years.

  • Effective treatment has extended the lifespans of Persons Living With HIV (PLWH). As fewer persons with HIV die from HIV-related causes, the number of PLWH continues to increase as new persons are newly diagnosed. The number of deaths in PLWH declined by 14% from 2014 to 2015.

  • As of the end of 2015, over 82,000 persons in Texas were known to be living with HIV. The CDC estimates that an additional 18,000 persons in Texas are living with HIV and are unaware of their infection.

 


 

Figure 2-2. Rate of New HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Race/Ethnicity, 2006 - 2015

Figure 2-2. Rate of New HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Race/Ethnicity, 2005 - 2014. Data in following link.

Data for Figure 2-2

 

  • Racial disparities in the rate of new HIV diagnoses persist despite declines in the rate of new HIV diagnoses among Black Texans.

  • The rates of new HIV diagnoses appear to have remained consistent in Whites, Hispanics, and persons of Other Races over the past 10 years while the rate in Blacks has decreased. These trends are affected by population growth in Texas during this time period. The Black population in Texas increased by 26% since 2005, while the number of new diagnoses in Blacks only increased by 3% - in other words, population growth outpaced new diagnoses. The number of new diagnoses in Hispanics increased by 27%, while the population of Hispanics grew by 33%, resulting in stable rates of new diagnoses.

 


 

Table 2-1. New HIV Diagnoses and Rates among Texans by Race/Ethnicity and Sex, 2015
 

Males

Females

Total

Race/Ethnicity

Number

%

Rate

Number

%

Rate

Number

%

Rate

White

812

22%

13.6

128

15%

2.1

940

21%

7.8

Black

1,199

33%

74.5

458

54%

26.7

1,657

37%

49.8

Hispanic

1,481

41%

27.6

225

27%

4.2

1,706

38%

16.0

Other

77

2%

11.0

17

2%

2.3

94

2%

6.5

Unknown

75

2%

-

14

2%

-

89

2%

-

TOTAL

3,644

81%

26.7

842

19%

6.1

4,486

100%

16.3

 

  • Despite the fact that Blacks comprise only 12% of the Texas population, over a third of all new HIV diagnoses among in Texas were among Blacks.

  • The vast difference in rate of new diagnoses per 100,000 population between Hispanics and Blacks, despite nearly equal numbers of new diagnoses, are a result of the much larger population of Hispanics in Texas. Hispanic persons newly diagnosed with HIV make up a smaller proportion of the Hispanic population compared to Blacks.

  • The racial disparity in new HIV diagnoses is most stark among females, where Black females have 5.4 times the rate of new diagnoses compared to racial group with the next highest rate.

 


 

Table 2-2. New HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Age Group and Sex, 2015
 

Males

Females

Total

Age (years)

Number

%

Rate

Number

%

Rate

Number

%

Rate

0-14

6

0.2%

0.2

11

1.3%

0.4

17

0.4%

0.3

15-24

974

26.7%

47.8

123

14.6%

6.4

1,097

24.5%

27.7

25-34

1,293

35.5%

63.5

249

29.6%

12.6

1,542

34.4%

38.4

34-44

660

18.1%

35.8

209

24.8%

11.3

869

19.4%

23.5

45+

711

19.5%

15.3

250

29.7%

4.9

961

21.4%

9.8

TOTAL

3,644

81%

26.7

842

19%

6.1

4,486

100%

16.3

 

  • The majority of persons newly diagnosed with HIV are between the ages of 15-34.

  • However, the age profile for persons newly diagnosed varies by sex. A higher proportion of newly diagnosed females are over the age of 25 compared to males. This is likely explained by a recent increase in new infections among young men who have sex with men (MSM) (see  Section 10: Men who have Sex with Men ).

  • The overall age profile of new HIV diagnoses remains largely young persons because less than 20% of new HIV diagnoses in Texas are among women. 

 


 

Figure 2-3. New HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Age Group, 2006 - 2015

Figure 2-3. Annual Number of New HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Age Group, 2005 - 2014. Data in following link.

Data for Figure 2-3

 

  • The number of new diagnoses in young persons age 15-24 has nearly doubled over the last 10 year, while the number of new diagnoses in persons 25-34 has also increased.

  • An increased availability of HIV testing, both through targeted and routine screenings, may be contributing to the decline in new diagnoses among persons over age 35 can be diagnosed earlier in their infections.

 


 

Figure 2-4. New HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Mode of Exposure, 2006 - 2015

Figure 2-4. New HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Mode of Exposure, 2005 - 2014. Data in following link.

Data for Figure 2-4

 

  • The majority of new HIV diagnoses in Texas are among men who have sex with men (MSM). The proportions of new diagnoses attributable to male-male sexual contact has increased by 32% since 2006. The HIV epidemic is now  largely driven by MSM transmission in Texas.

  • The declining number and proportion attributable to Persons who Inject Drugs (PWID) and Heterosexual contact indicates that prevention efforts with these groups have been effective.

 


 

Table 2-3. HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Mode of Exposure and Sex, 2015
 

Males

Females

Total

Exposure Category

N

%

N

%

N

%

MSM

3,141

86.2%

0

0.0%

3,141

70.0%

IDU

123

3.4%

125

14.8%

248

5.5%

MSM/IDU

128

3.5%

0

0.0%

128

2.9%

Heterosexual

246

6.8%

706

83.8%

952

21.2%

Pediatric

6

0.2%

11

1.3%

17

0.4%

Adult Other

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

Total

3,644

81.2%

842

18.8%

4,486

100.0%

 

  • The majority of new HIV diagnoses in Texas males are attributable to male-male sexual contact.

  • In females, the majority of new diagnoses are attributable to heterosexual sexual contact. Females have a higher biological risk of acquiring HIV from heterosexual contact compared to males. This may partially explain the disproportionately lower number of diagnoses in heterosexual males attributable to heterosexual contact compared to females.

 


 

Table 2-4. New HIV Diagnoses in Texas by Mode of Exposure and Race/Ethnicity, 2015
 

White

Black

Hispanic

Other

Unknown

Exposure Category

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

MSM

706

75.1%

1,009

60.9%

1,297

76.0%

66

70.2%

63

70.8%

IDU

75

8.0%

106

6.4%

59

3.5%

4

4.3%

4

4.5%

MSM/IDU

47

5.0%

30

1.8%

47

2.8%

2

2.1%

2

2.2%

Heterosexual

109

11.6%

503

30.4%

299

17.5%

22

23.4%

19

21.3%

Pediatric

3

0.3%

9

0.5%

4

0.2%

0

0.0%

1

1.1%

Total

940

21.0%

1,657

36.9%

1,706

38.0%

94

2.1%

89

2.0%

 

  • In all race groups, MSM comprised the majority of new diagnoses.

  • The largest number and proportion of new diagnoses attributable to heterosexual infection occur in Blacks and Hispanics.

  • It is important to note that a proportion of newly diagnosed HIV cases are reported with no identified risk. DSHS assigns these persons to risk groups based on their most likely mode of exposure according to a CDC-developed algorithm. While these assignments are based on years of data, it is possible that a certain percentage of newly diagnosed cases may be categorized incorrectly.

 


 

Table 2-5. Five Year Trends in HIV Diagnoses, Texas, 2015
 

Cumulative
Through 2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

5-year
Cumulative
2011-2015

 

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Sex

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Male

97,750

83%

3,432

79%

3,519

81%

3,525

81%

3,616

81%

3,644

81%

17,736

81%

 Female

20,359

17%

890

21%

834

19%

815

19%

824

19%

842

19%

4,205

19%

Race                            
 White

43,469

39%

876

20%

901

21%

918

21%

911

21%

940

21%

4,546

21%

 Black

37,880

34%

1,591

37%

1,587

36%

1,619

37%

1,637

37%

1,657

37%

8,091

37%

 Hispanic

27,237

24%

1,594

37%

1,642

38%

1,595

37%

1,696

38%

1,706

38%

8,233

38%

 Other

724

1%

74

2%

64

1%

77

2%

80

2%

94

2%

389

2%

 Unknown Race

2,199

2%

187

4%

159

4%

131

3%

116

3%

104

2%

682

3%

Age Group                            
 0-14

1,104

1%

30

1%

25

1%

15

0%

20

0%

17

0%

113

1%

 15-24

14,722

13%

1,030

24%

1,056

24%

1,031

24%

1,137

26%

1,097

24%

5,351

24%

 25-34

42,105

38%

1,260

29%

1,370

31%

1,434

33%

1,455

33%

1,542

34%

7,061

32%

 35-44

34,728

31%

962

23%

958

22%

924

21%

867

20%

892

20%

4,682

21%

 45+

18,850

17%

1,040

24%

985

23%

985

23%

932

21%

961

21%

4,903

22%

Exposure                            
 MSM

63,577

57%

2,844

66%

2,977

68%

2,986

69%

3,092

70%

3,141

70%

15,040

69%

 IDU

16,460

15%

263

6%

271

6%

211

5%

237

5%

248

6%

1,230

6%

 MSM/IDU

8,917

8%

130

3%

102

2%

126

3%

124

3%

128

3%

610

3%

 Heterosexual

20,812

19%

1,057

24%

979

22%

1,000

23%

967

22%

952

21%

4,955

23%

 Pediatric

967

1%

28

<1%

23

1%

17

0%

20

0%

179

<1%

105

<1%

 Adult Other

776

<1%

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

 

  • The demographic profile of the HIV epidemic in Texas has changed since the beginning of the epidemic.

  • In the first 30 years of the epidemic, persons diagnosed with HIV were mainly White MSM over the age of 25. By 2014, a person newly diagnosed with HIV was more likely to be young Black or Hispanic MSM under the age of 34.

 


Epi Profile

Table of Contents1. Executive Summary | 2. New HIV Diagnoses | 3. Persons Living with HIV | 4. Co-Morbidities | 5. HIV/AIDS Deaths | 6. HIV Incidence | 7. Targeted and Routine HIV Testing | 8. Indicators of HIV Risk in HIV-negative Persons at High Risk for HIV | 9. Indicators of HIV Risk in PLWH Currently in Care | 10. Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) | 11. HIV Treatment Cascade | Data Sources and Notes


Last updated March 6, 2017