• DSHS HIV/STD Program
    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, TX 78714

    Phone: 737-255-4300

    Email the HIV/STD Program

    Email HIV, STD, Hepatitis C, and TB data requests to the Program – Use this email to request Texas HIV, STD, Hepatitis C, and TB data and statistics. Do not use this email to request treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs or services. Do not email personal, identifying health information such as HIV status, date of birth, or Social Security Number.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local health department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to persons living with HIV, please contact your local HIV services organization.

Hepatitis Awareness Month


The month of May is Hepatitis Awareness Month and May 19th is Hepatitis Testing Day. During May, DSHS and our partners work to shed light on this hidden epidemic by raising awareness of viral hepatitis and encouraging all adults to get tested for hepatitis C at least once in their lifetime, per the CDC recommendation made in April 2020. [1]

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus. It kills more Americans than any other infectious disease. [2] It is spread through contact with infected blood, most commonly through sharing needles or other equipment used to inject drugs.

People living with hepatitis C often have no symptoms until they have significant liver damage. It is estimated that over 2.4 million people in the U.S. are living with hepatitis C but only 55.6% are aware of their infection. [2]

Effective treatments are available that cure more than 90% of people who take them, and there are few side effects. [3] See hepatitis C medical providers in Texas and general information about hepatitis C to learn more.

We encourage you to use the graphics and resources below to increase awareness of the impact of hepatitis C in Texas.  


Acute Hepatitis C in the U.S. and Texas, 2014-2018

  • Those who are diagnosed with hepatitis C early in the course of illness have acute hepatitis C infections. About half of the people with acute infections will progress to chronic infections. [4] Chronic hepatitis C infection is the leading cause of liver transplants in the U.S., and a leading cause of liver cancer. [5]
  • There has been an upward trend in the number of people diagnosed with acute hepatitis C reported in Texas between 2014 and 2018.
  • Despite the upward trend, acute hepatitis C is still severely underreported in Texas and nationwide. The number of people who acquire HCV every year is estimated to be 13.9 times higher than reported cases. [6] This means that around 900-1,000 Texas residents acquired hepatitis C in 2018.

Acute Hepatitis C in Texas, 2014-2018
  Acute Hepatitis C in Texas, 2014-2018. 2014 - 47 cases, .17 rate; 2015 - 48 cases, ..17 rate; 2016 - 40 cases, .14 rate; 2017 - 56 cases, .20 rate; 2018 - 76 cases, .26 rate

Estimated and Reported Acute Hepatitis C in Texas, 2014-2018
  Estimated and Reported Acute Hepatitis C in Texas, 2014-2018. 2014 - 47 reported, 653 estimated; 2015 - 48 reported, 667 estimated; 2016 - 40 reported, 556 estimated; 2017 - 56 reported, 778 estimated; 2018 - 76 reported, 1,056 estimated.


Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Age Group, 2014-2018

  • People between 25 and 44 years old accounted for half of all reported cases in these years.
  • In Texas potential acute hepatitis C investigations are prioritized for people 40 years or younger. This leads to potential under-reporting of diagnoses among people over 40 years old.

Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Age Group, 2014-2018
  Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Age Group, 2014-2018. Under 18 - 7; 18-24 - 35; 25-34 - 78; 35-44 - 58; 45-54 - 44; 55-64 - 28; 65-74 - 13; over 75 - 5.


Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Race/Ethnicity, 2014-2018

  • White people make up the highest proportion of acute hepatitis C cases. They are followed by Hispanic individuals, and then by Black individuals.
  • Acute hepatitis C is under-diagnosed and under-reported. Those who are diagnosed with hepatitis C early in the course of the illness (e.g., with acute hepatitis C) are more likely to be insured and to have access to primary care and regular screenings.
  • In Texas, Hispanic and Black people are more likely to be uninsured than the White population, leading to possible under-reporting and under-diagnosis of hepatitis C in these communities. [7]

Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Race/Ethnicity, 2014-2018
  Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Race/Ethnicity, 2014-2018. White - 141; Hispanic - 60; Black - 28; Other - 3; Unknown - 35.


Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Sex, 2014-2018

  • Males and females make up roughly equal shares of people with acute hepatitis C.

Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Sex, 2014-2018
  Acute Hepatitis C in Texas by Sex, 2014-2018. Female - 126, 47%; Male - 141, 53%.


Deaths Due to Hepatitis C, 2014-2018

  • Based on an analysis of Texas Vital Statistics death data, between 2014 and 2018, 1.5% of all deaths in Texas were attributed to either hepatitis C or a cancer related to hepatitis C.
  • During this time, 2,546 people had hepatitis C reported as their underlying cause of death, and an additional 11,549 people had cancers known to be related to hepatitis C virus (liver and hepatic bile duct cancers) reported as their underlying cause of death.
  • Two thirds of these reported deaths were in males.

14,140 deaths in Texas between 2014 and 2018 were due to Hepatitis C or a Hepatitis C-related cancer


To find treatment resources for Hepatitis C, visit the Texas Hepatitis C providers page.


Notes:

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Testing Recommendations for Hepatitis C Virus Infection.” 29 July 2020.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “New CDC Studies Underscore Urgency of Hepatitis C Testing and Treatment, Especially for Baby Boomers.” CDC Newsroom, 4 May 2016.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. What Is Hepatitis C - FAQ | CDC. 28 July 2020.
  4. Ryerson, A. Blythe. “Vital Signs: Newly Reported Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C Cases ― United States, 2009–2018.” MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 69, 2020.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Know More Hepatitis | CDC.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 Dec. 2020.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2017. November 14 2017.
  7. Kaiser Family Foundation. Uninsured Rates for the Nonelderly by Race/Ethnicity. 2019.



Last updated May 6, 2021