• DSHS HIV/STD Program
    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, TX 78714

    Phone: 737-255-4300

    Email the HIV/STD Program

    Email HIV, STD, Hepatitis C, and TB data requests to the Program – Use this email to request Texas HIV, STD, Hepatitis C, and TB data and statistics. Do not use this email to request treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs or services. Do not email personal, identifying health information such as HIV status, date of birth, or Social Security Number.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local health department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to persons living with HIV, please contact your local HIV services organization.

HIV and Black People in Texas


February 7 is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD). It is a day to increase awareness, start conversations, and highlight the work being done to reduce HIV in Black Texans. It is also time to show support for Black Texans living with HIV, and continue action to end health inequities.

DSHS estimates that a Black Texan acquires HIV about every 6 hours and made up a third of Texans who acquired HIV in 2019.

Even though Black people make up about 13% of the Texas population, the 35,834 Black people living with diagnosed HIV in 2019 made up more than a third of all of Texans living with diagnosed HIV in 2019.

Most of the Black Texans living with diagnosed HIV in 2019 were Black gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (MSM). Most of the Black people who got an HIV diagnosis in 2019 were MSM, but had a younger profile.

Black Texans living with diagnosed HIV in 2019

Black Texans diagnosed with HIV in 2019

By Age
Black Texans Living with Diagnosed HIV in 2019 by Age. 25-34, 8,567; 45-54, 8,433; 35-44, 8,227; 55-64, 6,611; 65+, 2,215; 15-24, 1,681; 0-14, 100.
100 people were younger than 15

By Age
Black Texans Living Who Were Diagnosed with HIV in 2019 by Age. 25-34, 539; 15-24, 409; 35-44, 268; 45-54, 156; 55-64, 94; 65+, 28; 0-14, 4.
Four people were younger than 15

By Mode of Transmission
Black Texans Living with Diagnosed HIV in 2019 by Mode of Transmission. MSM, 17,238; Heterosexual men and women, 12,403; PWOD, 4,097; MSM/PWID, 1,598.
PWID - People who Inject Drugs

By Mode of Transmission
Black Texans Who Were Diagnosed with HIV in 2019 by Mode of Transmission. MSM, 893; Heterosexual men and women, 443; PWOD, 105; MSM/PWID, 105.
PWID - People who Inject Drugs


There are promising trends. The estimated number of Black Texans getting HIV has fallen by 17% since 2010 – from an estimated 1,800 acquisitions in 2010 to around 1,490 in 2019. The proportion of Black Texans living with HIV who know their status is 88% - very close to the goal of 90%.

7 of 8 Black Texans Living with HIV Know Their Status

These gains are not seen for all groups. From 2010 to 2019, the estimated number of Black heterosexual women who acquired HIV each year dropped by about 25%, but the estimated annual number of Black MSM who acquired HIV was stable. The proportion of Black MSM with HIV who know their status was also lower than Black women’s. DSHS is currently unable to estimate HIV acquisition and knowledge of status for transgender Texans.

HIV Trends among Black Texans 
Number of people living with diagnosed HIV in 2019 Estimated number of people who acquired HIV in 2010 and 2019 Estimated percentage of people with HIV who know their status in 2019

Black Texans

35,834

1,800 to 1,494

88%

Black MSM

17,238

Flat at 975

85%

Black heterosexual women

9,340

439 to 329

89%

Black transgender women

416

   

For people living with HIV, treatment is the key to a long, healthy life. People with HIV who take medicines regularly can reduce the amount of HIV in their bodies to very low levels. This is also called having a suppressed viral load. Having a suppressed viral load improves the health and wellbeing of people with HIV. It also means they cannot transmit HIV to others through sex.

In 2019, about three out of four Black Texans with diagnosed HIV had at least one HIV-related medical visit, and far fewer were in continuous treatment or had a suppressed viral load.

For every 100 Black Texans living with diagnosed HIV: 75 had some care, 67 were retained in care, 55 had suppressed viral load. For every 100 Black Heterosexual women living with diagnosed HIV: 77 had some care, 69 were retained in care, 59 had suppressed viral load. For every 100 Black MSM living with diagnosed HIV: 75 had some care, 66 were retained in care, 55 had suppressed viral load. For every 100 Black Transgender Women living with diagnosed HIV: 85 had some care, 77 were retained in care, 57 had suppressed viral load.

Had some care means someone had at least one HIV-related medical appointment in the year.
Retained in care means that they had at least two HIV-related medical visits at least 90 days apart during the year.


PrEP is a highly effective way to prevent HIV. It is a prescription medicine that when taken regularly can prevent HIV from taking hold in the body. It is recommended for people at higher risk of getting HIV, especially MSM and transgender women. DSHS estimates that only a small percent of people who could benefit from PrEP are using it. Find out more about PrEP.

These are not ordinary times, but you, your friends, and loved ones can still get PrEP, HIV testing, and treatment. Use the HIV services directory to find out how and where to get these services. If you need help affording your HIV treatment medications, the Texas HIV Medication Program may be able to help. You can also talk to your healthcare provider about getting a test or finding treatment.



Last updated May 20, 2021